At present Norfolk Grey's do not have their own breed club and are classified as a rare breed by the Poultry Club of Great Britain

 

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The following extracts has been taken from 'The Feathered World Yearbook' of 1927 from an article written by Mr Thomas Leyson a well respected  breeder and exhibitor of the Norfolk Grey in the early years of the breeds creation.

 

 

 

I feel that a more able pen than mine is needed to do justice to this fine breed, yet I am delighted at the chance of doing what I can to help and only hope that these notes will be of interest to both old hands and new and cause at least a few to give the variety a trial'.

 

 

The colouring of the bird is black and silver, one of the most striking combinations in the world, and few breeds can equal them in beauty and plumage.  Add to this the graceful and alert carriage, glorious, full, dark and bold eyes and sterling utility qualities, and you have the reasons - good reasons too for their fast growing popularity. 

 

 

I have kept most of the known breeds of poultry and find the Norfolks equal to any.  For the small fancier they are ideal, as competition is very open and new breeders coming in now stand an excellent chance of going quickly to the top of the tree. 

 

 

These days there seems to be a craze in the fancy and in utility circles too - foreign breeds.  But I am glad to say that the Norfolk Grey is British throughout and I would urge all breeders in these times of financial stress to keep their money at home or in the words of a famous British motor-car manufacturer:

 

"Buy British and be proud of it!"

 

 

 

 

Quote from Poultry Club Year Book 1927 by Mr Fred Myhill the breeds originator :

 

 

 

 

'Here's a hint to all those that I love,

And a hint to all those that love me,
And a hint to all those that love those that I love,
And to those that love those that love me.
'Try Norfolk Greys'
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Introduction to the Rare Breed Norfolk Grey